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REDD basics

About REDD

About 5.2 million hectares of forests are lost every year in developing countries, mainly in South America, Southeast Asia, and Central Africa.
Deforestation and forest degradation on such a scale has a serious adverse impact on the economic activities and environment of forest countries and regions and results in increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, the main cause of global warming.
Factors such as the expansion of commercial logging, cash crops and export crop production, etc. greatly contribute to such deforestation.
Nevertheless, no mechanism to prevent emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries has been included in the international framework on climate change to date. Accordingly, the establishment of such a mechanism to provide developing countries with financial incentives has been discussed as the main agenda item of international negotiations on climate change.
The scheme called REDD (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation) has been drawing considerable attention from developed and developing countries since a new approach to address these issues was proposed at the 11th session of the Conference of Parties (COP11) in 2005.

(Source: Global Forest Resources Assessment 2010, FAO)

Basic Concept of REDD

Economic incentives are provided with respect to the difference between the reference level and emissions in cases where deforestation and forest degradation have actually been curbed.
The scheme called REDD (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation) has been drawing considerable attention from developed and developing countries since a new approach to address these issues was proposed at the 11th session of the Conference of Parties (COP11) in 2005.

From REDD to REDD-Plus

Initial discussions on REDD focused only on reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries. In subsequent negotiations, REDD has been expanded to REDD-plus, which involves the conservation of forest carbon stocks, development of sustainable forest management, and enhancement of forest carbon stocks.
Meanwhile, REDD-plus activities could also impact on the cultures and livelihoods of the indigenous ethnic groups living there and the conservation of biodiversity, etc. Therefore, safeguards to prevent adverse impacts on the functions of forests and the society and economy of developing countries have become one of the key agenda items when discussing REDD-plus.